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2015: The Year of the Cauliflower

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February 16, 2015 by Johanna Burani

Franca's Quinoa Cakes

Some culinary experts and nutrition watchers are predicting a “coming out” of sorts in 2015 for the underrated cauliflower. This cruciferous cousin to broccoli has been in the hands of cooks since the 4th century B.C. So why has it been given the nod now? Perhaps because of its versatility: it can be baked, boiled, mashed, fried, or pureed, or perhaps because of its friendliness to other flavors. Also, it’s nutrient-dense (Vitamin C, folic acid, potassium, Vitamin B6, copper) while carrying few calories of its own.

I was talking about food with my good Italian friend, Franca, over a coffee in her Parisian apartment a few weeks ago. We shared our cauliflower recipes. This one that she created is not only delicious but also low GI. Try it. You’ll be part of the latest culinary trend!

Franca’s Quinoa Cakes
I was talking about food with my good Italian friend, Franca, over a coffee in her Parisian apartment a few weeks ago. We shared our cauliflower recipes. This one that she created is not only delicious but also low GI. Try it. You’ll be part of the latest culinary trend!
Created by:
Cuisine: international
Recipe type: Vegetarian Entree
Serves: 6 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 ½ lbs (680 g) cauliflower
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, separated
  • 1 cup (170 g) quinoa
Instructions
  1. Cut the cauliflower into small pieces. Boil in lightly salted water until cooked (15 minutes).
  2. Place cooked cauliflower, the garlic, 2 tablespoons olive oil, and 4 tablespoons of cooking water in a blender. Process until smooth and creamy (1 minute). Set aside.
  3. Cook quinoa in 2 cups of the same salted cooking water until it is absorbed, about 15 minutes.
  4. Moisten 6½ –cup ramekins with cooking spray. While still hot, firmly press the quinoa into the ramekins. Turn them over, releasing the quinoa “cakes” onto a flat serving platter. Serve the cauliflower on the side. Serve warm.
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1 cake and ½ cup of cauliflower Calories: 196 Fat: 9g Carbohydrates: 26g Fiber: 3g Protein: 6g Cholesterol: 0mg

 


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Gushers vs Tricklers


"Gushers" are quickly-digested carbohydrates that cause a rapid rise in blood glucose and fuel appetite.

"Tricklers" are slowly-digested carbohydrates that are gradually released into the bloodstream and sustain satiety. These are the good carbs.


Johanna Burani
MS, RD, CDE
Nutrition Works LLC
Morristown, NJ, USA

Expert in individualized, low-glycemic index (low GI) meal planning.

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