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Posts Tagged ‘food shopping’

  1. A Company with a Cause

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    February 22, 2016 by Johanna Burani

    Twenty-nine million Americans (9.3% of the total population) have diabetes.  Eight million of these people don’t know they have it.  More than one million Americans are diagnosed every year.  All of these people are living with a chronic disease that has, as yet, no cure and that requires certain lifestyle accommodations to avoid serious health complications.

    No one is giving up, though.

    Research scientists are seeking ways to regenerate human beta cells, improve islet transplantation technology, or understand autoimmune responses leading to type 1 diabetes.  Diabetes educators and physicians work tirelessly with their patients to foster efficacious changes in dietary and exercise habits, stress management, and proper drug-taking procedures.

    The food industry has addressed the need for “diabetes-friendly” foods.  As people living with diabetes will attest, there is a plethora of viable packaged food choices for their consumption.  Several food companies have made a commitment to the diabetes community to develop and sell products specific for people with diabetes.

    fifty50logoaOne such company is FIFTY 50 Foods, Inc.  This New Jersey-based food company started in 1990 and its roster of products has grown from 3 items to 24.  They offer low glycemic cookies and wafers, oatmeal, fruit spreads, table syrup, piecrust, chocolates and peanut butter.  Their products are tasteful and healthful.

    But FIFTY50’s commitment to the people living with diabetes is more than just tasty, healthful foods.  FIFTY50 also offers its customers hope for a cure.  By donating 50% of their profits to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, they are helping medical science inch its way to one day discovering a cure for diabetes. To date, they have contributed over $14 million to the cause.

    family-group500x325I hope my readers with diabetes will try FIFTY50 products.  I stand behind their low-glycemic profile.  And I believe you will enjoy not only their products but also the “sweet taste” of supporting diabetes research.

    You can find out more about the FIFTY50 company and their products here: www.fifty50.com.


  2. New for EatGoodCarbs readers: ZipList

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    February 5, 2013 by Johanna Burani

    I am happy to announce a brand new feature that will make this blog more valuable to my followers. EatGoodCarbs.com is now a partner of ZipList, an online recipe clipping and grocery list site. After creating your free account, you can save your favorite recipes to your Personal Recipe Box, by clicking the little blue “Save” box in the upper right corner of every EatGoodCarbs.com recipe. You will then be able to store all of your recipes in one convenient location, for easy reference. Your recipes will be available on your computer, as well as on your smartphone or tablet. Additionally, you will be able to print a shopping list for your needed ingredients.

    Enjoy this new convenience!


  3. Shopping for Good Carbs

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    January 14, 2013 by Johanna Burani

    Old Fashioned OatsLet’s face it, our mothers and grandmothers had an easier time food shopping than we do today.  They mostly cooked from scratch.  Their ingredients were simple: flour, sugar, butter, potatoes, milk, broccoli, spinach, apples, a chicken or pork roast.  They knew if their foods were fresh or not by “reading” their appearances rather than the labels they were wrapped in. They didn’t have to deal with “organic,” “gluten free,” “whole grain,” “low fat,” and so on.  How times have changed!

    Of course, we, too, can choose to cook our meals from scratch and many are doing just that.  But this is not an option for everyone.  So we must become savvy shoppers, knowing how to separate the marketing jargon from the true nutritional facts found on packaged foods.  This applies to concerns about calories, fat, fiber, salt, preservatives and, yes, good carbs.

    What are you looking for when shopping for good carbs?  Here are the most essential properties:

    • short list of ingredients – usually a good sign of minimal processing (e.g. Quaker’s old fashioned oats has one ingredient: 100% rolled oats)Food Label
    • natural ingredients – you should be able to pronounce and spell these! (e.g. Breyer’s vanilla ice cream contains milk, cream, sugar, tara gum, natural flavor)
    • first ingredient is a whole and intact grain (e.g. brown rice, bulgur, lentils)
    • the food resembles its original form (corn on the cob vs. popcorn or corn flakes)

    Here is a partial list of good carbs to get you started:

    • all-bran cereals and large, thick oat flakes requiring 5+ minutes cooking time
    • all rye/pumpernickel-based breads and crackers
    • all pasta: cooked al dente (not overcooked or precooked)brown, long grain and wild rice
    • all whole grains: barley, buckwheat, bulgur, corn
    • all legumes: beans, lentils, chickpeas, split peas, black-eyed peasall fresh vegetables, except parsnips, white potatoes, pumpkin, rutabaga
    • all fresh fruits, except watermelon, very ripe pineapple, very ripe, large bananas
    • all canned fruit in its own juice, except pineapple and lychees
    • all dairy foods: milk, yogurt, ice cream, cooked puddings, custards and mousses
    • all nuts and chocolate (especially dark)

    Happy shopping!


Gushers vs Tricklers


"Gushers" are quickly-digested carbohydrates that cause a rapid rise in blood glucose and fuel appetite.

"Tricklers" are slowly-digested carbohydrates that are gradually released into the bloodstream and sustain satiety. These are the good carbs.


Johanna Burani
MS, RD, CDE
Nutrition Works LLC
Morristown, NJ, USA

Expert in individualized, low-glycemic index (low GI) meal planning.

This book tells the complete story

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