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Posts Tagged ‘low glycemic index’

  1. A Company with a Cause

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    February 22, 2016 by Johanna Burani

    Twenty-nine million Americans (9.3% of the total population) have diabetes.  Eight million of these people don’t know they have it.  More than one million Americans are diagnosed every year.  All of these people are living with a chronic disease that has, as yet, no cure and that requires certain lifestyle accommodations to avoid serious health complications.

    No one is giving up, though.

    Research scientists are seeking ways to regenerate human beta cells, improve islet transplantation technology, or understand autoimmune responses leading to type 1 diabetes.  Diabetes educators and physicians work tirelessly with their patients to foster efficacious changes in dietary and exercise habits, stress management, and proper drug-taking procedures.

    The food industry has addressed the need for “diabetes-friendly” foods.  As people living with diabetes will attest, there is a plethora of viable packaged food choices for their consumption.  Several food companies have made a commitment to the diabetes community to develop and sell products specific for people with diabetes.

    fifty50logoaOne such company is FIFTY 50 Foods, Inc.  This New Jersey-based food company started in 1990 and its roster of products has grown from 3 items to 24.  They offer low glycemic cookies and wafers, oatmeal, fruit spreads, table syrup, piecrust, chocolates and peanut butter.  Their products are tasteful and healthful.

    But FIFTY50’s commitment to the people living with diabetes is more than just tasty, healthful foods.  FIFTY50 also offers its customers hope for a cure.  By donating 50% of their profits to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, they are helping medical science inch its way to one day discovering a cure for diabetes. To date, they have contributed over $14 million to the cause.

    family-group500x325I hope my readers with diabetes will try FIFTY50 products.  I stand behind their low-glycemic profile.  And I believe you will enjoy not only their products but also the “sweet taste” of supporting diabetes research.

    You can find out more about the FIFTY50 company and their products here: www.fifty50.com.


  2. Fog

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    June 8, 2015 by Johanna Burani

    Sergio_150601_1542The fog comes

    on little cat feet.

    It sits looking

    over harbor and city

    on silent haunches

    and then moves on.

    Carl Sandburg (1878 – 1967)

     

    The fog of San Francisco is a distinctive characteristic of that beautiful city. It can make the sun, the Golden Gate Bridge and tall buildings and trees disappear before your eyes! This famous fog also carries colonies of a local bacterium called Lactobacillus San Francisco. It is the secret ingredient of another well-known feature of San Francisco: its sourdough bread.

    The basic ingredients of any bread are flour, water and yeast. The yeast, when hydrated, Sergio_150603_1635feed on the starch in the flour, increasing them in size and number (budding). As this process continues, the flour mixture ferments, producing what we call a “dough.” We shape it, bake it and then eat it. Most of us love the taste of this final product, bread.

    But when bacteria enter the usual mix, magic happens. They produce lactic acid during fermentation and give the resulting dough a tangy or “sour” taste when baked. This is what the Boudin family discovered quite by accident when they left Paris and set up a bakery to serve both locals and gold-rush prospectors in San Francisco in 1849. They thought they were preparing their Parisian recipe for baguettes. The San Francisco fog, however, heavy with wild Lactobacilli San Francisco, unwittingly changed their recipe forever. Their new and unique sourdough bread became an instant hit.

    Today sourdough bread is enjoyed throughout America and beyond. Its high acidity (pH 4.0 – 4.5) makes it a good low glycemic carbohydrate choice (GI 48 – 57). It moves slowly out of the stomach and into the small intestine gradually releasing glucose into the bloodstream. This is good news for blood glucose control, satiety, weight management and energy endurance.

    You can use sourdough bread as you would any other type of bread. I like grilling thin slices of it rubbed with raw garlic and then drizzled with extra virgin olive oil

    Sergio_150601_1626


  3. Diets Don’t Work

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    November 21, 2012 by Johanna Burani

    We Americans are getting ready to celebrate Thanksgiving Day.  This is when we commemorate the Pilgrims’ gratitude for surviving their first year in the New World.  Many died, weakened by disease and chronic lack of food.  The strong ones planted crops, harvested them and then celebrated their good fortune.  Some records say the Pilgrims and their Indian neighbors eat and drank in abundance (for them) for three solid days!

    We will all be overeating on Thanksgiving too.  But, sadly, overeating is a daily occurrence for many people.  We all know the obesity statistics and the connection to consistent overconsumption of calories is direct and unquestionable.

    A recent survey conducted by Slimsticks, a weight loss firm, found that approximately 28% of young people try a new diet program every month in a desperate attempt to lose at least some of the extra pounds and 45% of them give it up after just one week.  These numbers coincide with the 48.9% of all dieters who also give up their latest diet approach after one month.

    Why?

    Because diets don’t work.  Here are two reasons why:

    1. the changes being made (no more ice cream – ever, no more pasta, or bread or chocolate or desserts – ever) are not reasonable or sustainable.  These are not behavioral changes, they’re dietary changes:  You go on a diet – you lose weight – and you go off the diet and magically keep the weight off.  It never happens this way, does it?
    2. cutting back on calories leaves you feeling hungry.  It’s hard to cut calories when you are hungry and dreaming about a bagel.

    Enter low glycemic index carbohydrates.  They keep you feeling fuller longer.  No hunger.  No cravings.  And no diet.  Switch your kaiser roll for rye bread, don’t overcook your pasta, opt for sweet potatoes over mashed white potatoes, snack on nuts instead of rice cakes or popcorn.  You’ll feel fuller longer.  You won’t be hungry or have cravings.  And you won’t be on a diet.

    Try it and see for yourself.


  4. The Glycemic Index Tells Us What the Body Already Knows

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    September 10, 2012 by Johanna Burani

    Today NPR highlighted a recent study conducted by David Ludwig, MD of Children’s Hospital in Boston that illustrated the appetite-suppressing benefits of a well balanced low glycemic index (GI) diet.  As one of the study’s participants explained, high GI carbs just did not sustain him and he was hungry soon after polishing off a large bowl of mashed potatoes.  This is because high GI carbs (like mashed potatoes) are quickly digested in the gut.  This causes first a surge of sugar to be released into the blood followed by a rapid drop in sugar levels from all the insulin the pancreas released in response to the mashed potatoes.  This roller coaster results in hunger, low energy and causes the body to more readily store calories as fat.

    Not all nutrition professionals look kindly on the concept of the glycemic index.  As the dietitian who was interviewed for this segment mentioned, there are many variables that may impact on a food’s GI value: the ripeness of a fruit, the under- or overcooking of starches like pasta or rice, the presence or absence of other nutrients in the gut along with the carb (fat, protein, soluble fiber).  Thanks to decades of valid GI testing by researchers in many parts of the world, we know these facts to be true.  However, this is indeed how we eat.  Our pasta at dinner tonight was cooked.  The length of time it stayed in the water, the fat-protein-fiber content of the other foods on that same dish are factors that influenced the rate at which our gut is turning that pasta into glucose and releasing it into our blood supply.  The glycemic index is telling us what the body already knows!


Gushers vs Tricklers


"Gushers" are quickly-digested carbohydrates that cause a rapid rise in blood glucose and fuel appetite.

"Tricklers" are slowly-digested carbohydrates that are gradually released into the bloodstream and sustain satiety. These are the good carbs.


Johanna Burani
MS, RD, CDE
Nutrition Works LLC
Morristown, NJ, USA

Expert in individualized, low-glycemic index (low GI) meal planning.

This book tells the complete story

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